Review – An Introduction to English Poetry

Posted 24 March, 2014 by Nikki in Academic, Reviews / 3 Comments

Cover of An Introduction to English Poetry by James FentonAn Introduction to English Poetry, James Fenton

This is a very clear introduction to the formal aspects of poetry, but it also serves as a reintroduction for someone who has an English Lit degree but never got very interested in the technical aspects of poetry.

We disagree on quite a few things — his characterisation of Anglo-Saxon poetry as “not English” (because of course, it is quintessentially English: the Anglo-Saxons became the English), for example, and his doubtfulness about Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (there are dialect words in Sir Gawain which survive still: just because Chaucer’s Middle English is closer to what became universal doesn’t mean Sir Gawain is irrelevant). Also his relative dismissiveness of tight forms like the villanelle: he rightly praises one of the most famous, Dylan Thomas’, but is otherwise fairly unimpressed by it. I love villanelles, and I think more people have “done them right” than he suggests.

Still, with short, easy-to-digest chapters, clear explanations, and a helpful glossary, not to mention the addition of his thoughts as a practitioner of the craft, this is an interesting and informative introduction to a cross-section of English poetry.

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3 Responses to “Review – An Introduction to English Poetry”

  1. I have yet to see a book discussing the formal aspects of poetry that leaves out the author’s personal preferences. Which is… actually pretty interesting. I can’t say I’ve seen that to anywhere near the same extent with any of the books on the formal aspects of prose. :/

  2. I’m not sure about any technical aspects of poetry but the villanelle is a worthwhile form if there were only the One. “Do not go gentle……..”

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