Tag: weekly roundup


Stacking the Shelves

Posted 4 February, 2017 by Nikki in General / 20 Comments

Happy Saturday! Not that it’s the end of the work week for me. Big project to be doing, which means a surprising amount of money and hopefully a correspondingly large number of books. Also, class.

But still, I managed quite a bit of reading this week!

Received to review

Cover of The Heart of What Was Lost by Tad Williams Cover of The Regional Office is Under Attack Cover of Masquerade by Laura Lam Cover of Final Girls by Mira Grant

Hee! I need to reread The Dragonbone Chair, stat — I’ve been meaning to for a while anyway, but now this is extra motivation. I’m not sure if The Heart of What Was Lost stands alone, but it sounds like it comes after the series?

Bought

Cover of p53: The Gene that Cracked the Cancer Code by Sue Armstrong

It’s fine, Mum, it cost £1.49, and besides, it’s always a good thing for me to read about things that scare me. Knowledge is power, etc.

Finished reading this week:

Cover of Proust and the Squid by Maryanne Wolf Cover of Martians Abroad by Carrie Vaughn Cover of Binti: Home by Nnedi Okorafor Cover of Passing Strange by Ellen Klages

Cover of Final Girls by Mira Grant Cover of Birthright by Missouri Valin Cover of Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear Cover of p53: The Gene that Cracked the Cancer Code by Sue Armstrong

Not a bad week, as you see! And five of them were ARCs. Hurrah me. And the ratings sneak peek:

4 stars… p53: The Gene that Cracked the Cancer Code, Final Girls and Passing Strange.
3 stars… Proust and the Squid and Birthright.
2 stars… Martians Abroad, Binti: Home and Maisie Dobbs.

Reviews posted this week:

Throne of Glass, by Sarah J. Maas. A reread, which I once again found solidly enjoyable. I don’t expect great literary merit from Maas, just a fun time, which maybe helps. 3/5 stars
The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet, by Becky Chambers. A lovely space opera adventure, full of characters you get to know and love. Just one criticism: the vaguely episodic feel to each of the events. Everything feels like it gets wrapped up very quickly, with only the bare bones of a larger plot. 4/5 stars
Weird Dinosaurs: The Strange New Fossils Challenging Everything We Thought We Knew, by John Pickrell. Very enjoyable, and not always just for the dinosaurs but also for the people — almost characters — caught up in their story. 4/5 stars
The Return of the King, by J.R.R. Tolkien. I still love this, but my review this time poked at some of the flaws. 5/5 stars
The Sense of Style, by Steven Pinker. If you’ve encountered academic technobabble, and particularly if you’re allergic to it, this makes a good antidote. 4/5 stars
Gutenberg’s Fingerprint, by Merilyn Simonds. More of a memoir than I’d thought going in. Some interesting stuff, but… meh. 2/5 stars
Strangers in Company, by Jane Aiken Hodge. Mystery, politics and romance, in the vein of a Mary Stewart novel. Fun, though not mindblowing. 3/5 stars

Other posts:

Top Ten Tuesday: Graphic Novels. A rundown of my favourites!
What are you reading Wednesday. Another update from my neverending assault on Mount TBR.

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Stacking the Shelves

Posted 28 January, 2017 by Nikki in General / 8 Comments

Happy Saturday! I’d be glad it’s the weekend, but it doesn’t make too much difference to me. I still have work I should be doing, alas.

Books to review

Cover of Luna: Wolf Moon by Ian McDonald Cover of Binti: Home by Nnedi Okorafor Cover of Passing Strange by Ellen Klages

I might not be a lit student anymore, but King Arthur is still a major interest of mine. Fascinated to see what this is like! And hurrah for all the others, too, though now I have to hurry up and read Luna: New Moon. Oops…

Books bought this week

Cover of Goldenhand by Garth Nix

I know, Mum, I know, but it was £2.39 on Kindle and I’m going to read it at some point anyway, it’s the latest in a series.

Books read this week

Cover of Mesopotamia by Gwendolyn Leick Cover of Temeraire by Naomi Novik Cover of The Burning Page by Genevieve Cogman

Not much reading, I know… I’ll get back to it. Preview of my ratings:

1 star – Mesopotamia.
4 stars – Temeraire (His Majesty’s Dragon) and The Burning Page.

Reviews posted this week:

The Book, by Keith Houston. This is a beautiful physical object, just on its own, and the story it tells of how books came to be is also fascinating. It’d definitely make a good gift, and I’m keeping my copy for sure. 5/5 stars
The Litany of Earth, by Ruthanna Emrys. This short story introduces the world of Winter Tide, and I actually preferred it — the shortness gave it something. 4/5 stars
The Horse and His Boy, by C.S. Lewis. This one has not really aged well in terms of the stereotypes and such. But I still kind of enjoyed it, despite that. 3/5 stars
Slade House, by David Mitchell. This was a little bit repetitive, but it mostly works. I just wish it wasn’t connected to his other books; I hate feeling like I don’t have the full story. 3/5 stars
A Little Princess, by Frances Hodgson Burnett. Ugh, so preachy. Nope. Without nostalgia or something, I don’t see why this appeals. 2/5 stars
The Toll-Gate, by Georgette Heyer. A likeable hero and heroine, a fun mystery, and Heyer showing off her research and knowledge. Yes! 4/5 stars
Armada, by Ernest Cline. Mmm. This didn’t really work for me, because it felt like the same formula as Ready Player One, without the warmth. 2/5 stars
Prince Caspian, by C.S. Lewis. One of my favourites of the Narnia books — I’m not sure why, but I’ve always had a soft spot for Caspian. 4/5 stars

Other posts: 

Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Books to Nibble. A guest post by my bunny, complete with silly picture.
What are you reading Wednesday. An update on what I’ve been reading.

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Stacking the Shelves

Posted 21 January, 2017 by Nikki in General / 6 Comments

G’morning, people! It’s been a quiet week for me, as I got down to work on my second and third assignments. After this third one, though, I get a break again! Not too much of one… but still enough. Also, I’ve started playing Final Fantasy XV, and that’s just eating my free time.

Received to review:

Cover of Traitor to the Throne by Alwyn Hamilton

My wish was granted on Netgalley, to my surprise! Looking forward to reading this; I wasn’t totally blown away by Rebel of the Sands, but it was definitely enjoyable.

Read this week:

Cover of Miranda and Caliban by Jacqueline Carey Cover of Natural Histories by Brett Westwood Cover of The Family Plot by Cherie Priest Cover of Dreadnought

4 stars to… Miranda and Caliban and Dreadnought.
3 stars to… Natural Histories and The Family Plot.

A light reading week, for me. Alas.

Reviews posted this week:

The Invisible Library, by Genevieve Cogman. So much fun, and perhaps a little easier to follow having read it once before. I do love the sheer fun of these books. 4/5 stars
Fair Chance, by Josh Lanyon. The characters continue to be fun and totally non-stereotypical, though the mystery relied a bit too much on coincidence. 4/5 stars
Camelot’s Shadow, by Sarah Zettel. A reread just for fun, and one I enjoyed very much. Probably my favourite of the four books, this one features Sir Gawain, so, you know. 4/5 stars
Grey Mask, by Patricia Wentworth. Not a bad read, but a bit too obvious. And oh wow, one of the main characters is just… silly. 3/5 stars
Invisible Planets, ed. Ken Liu. I wanted to enjoy this more than I did, because it’s a great range of stories. But for me the translation doesn’t quite work. 3/5 stars
The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, by C.S. Lewis. I still don’t get the appeal of Turkish Delight, but everything else about this book is a delight to me, despite the allegory. 4/5 stars
A Taste of Honey, by Kai Ashante Wilson. With this one, I think I have to rule Wilson’s work just not to my taste. There is some great worldbuilding and sensual, lyrical language… but it just isn’t for me. 2/5 stars

Other posts:

Top Ten Tuesday: Hidden Gems. Books I wish more other people would read, so we can talk about ’em.

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Stacking the Shelves

Posted 14 January, 2017 by Nikki in General / 12 Comments

Hey everyone! It’s been a pretty good week, and now I’m back in Belgium with my wife, which is nice. Also a 13.5kg box of books I sent via courier is already here, so hurrah!

Received to review

Cover of The Ninth Rain by Jen Williams

I still need to catch up on the Copper Cat books, but looks like this stands alone? And I love the cover.

Books bought

Note to Mum: before you lecture me, I got these with the Amazon card I got from Laura, okay?

Cover of Mesopotamia by Gwendolyn Leick Cover of Dusk or Dark or Dawn Or Day by Seanan McGuire Cover of Chimes at Midnight by Seanan McGuire Cover of The Winter Long by Seanan McGuire

By which you see, yep, yet more Seanan McGuire, since I finished An Artificial Night this week and loved it.

Books finished:

Cover of Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly Cover of I Contain Multitudes by Ed Yong Cover of Green Mill Murder by Kerry Greenwood Cover of Blood and Circuses by Kerry Greenwood

Cover of An Artificial Night by Seanan McGuire Cover of The Prince of the Moon by Megan Derr Cover of Dead Until Dark by Charlaine Harris Cover of Dusk or Dark or Dawn Or Day by Seanan McGuire

And a little preview of my opinions…

4 stars to… Hidden Figures, I Contain Multitudes, The Green Mill Murder, Blood and Circuses, An Artificial Night and Dusk or Dark or Dawn or Day.
3 stars to… The Prince of the Moon
1 star to… Dead Until Dark

Reviews posted this week:

The Steerswoman, by Rosemary Kirstein. Slow, but satisfying, with some very good female characters and a fascinating central concept. 4/5 stars
How to Clone a Mammoth, by Beth Shapiro. Okay, the answer is mostly ‘you can’t’, but the book is still informative about cloning and rewilding. 4/5 stars
Carry On, by Rainbow Rowell. A reread for the comfort factor, so no surprises I loved it again. 5/5 stars
Where Am I Now? by Mara Wilson. Entertaining, and also poignant about the road Wilson has taken to get where she is. 4/5 stars
The Assassin’s Blade, by Sarah J. Maas. Probably not so entertaining/relevant if you’re not a fan already. 3/5 stars
Ayiti, by Roxane Gay. A collection of stories set in and about Haiti. Fascinating and vivid. 4/5 stars
The Magician’s Nephew, by C.S. Lewis. A little too preachy, and definitely not my favourite Narnia book. Nor my least favourite, though. 3/5 stars

Other posts:

Top Ten Tuesday: 2016 Releases I Didn’t Get Round To. Aka, The Guilt Trip.

How’s everyone’s week been? Reading plenty? Let me know in the comments!

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Stacking the Shelves

Posted 7 January, 2017 by Nikki in General / 18 Comments

Good morning, folks! Or not, if you’re not in the UK/Europe. So, 2017 so far… not bad, from where I’m sitting?

Received to review:

Cover of Brimstone by Cherie Priest Cover of Birthright by Missouri Vaun Cover of With Blood Upon the Sand by Bradley S. Beaulieu Cover of The Prince of the Moon by Megan Derr

Cherie Priest! I’m looking forward to it even without knowing much about it. I’ve been a lucky pup this week, really.

Non-fiction:

Cover of The Disappearing Spoon by Sam Kean Cover of The Violinist's Thumb by Sam Kean Cover of The World Without Us by Alan Weisman Cover of Rosalind Franklin by Brenda Maddox

I’ve already read two of these… guess I was in the non-fiction mood.

Fiction:

Cover of Discount Armageddon by Seanan McGuire Cover of With Fate Conspire by Marie Brennan Cover of A Borrowed Man by Gene Wolfe Cover of Shadowplay by Laura Lam

Because I don’t have enough Seanan McGuire in my backlog…

Finished this week:

Cover of The Secret Library by Oliver Tearle Cover of The Return of the King by J.R.R. Tolkien Cover of On Basilisk Station by David Weber Cover of Rolling in the Deep by Mira Grant Cover of Adulthood is a Myth by Sarah Andersen

Cover of The World Without Us by Alan Weisman Cover of The Unreal and the Real by Ursula Le Guin Cover of The Disappearing Spoon by Sam Kean Cover of Scarlet by A.C. Gaughen Cover of The Tyrannosaur Chronicles by David Hone

Reviews posted this week:

City of Wolves, by Willow Palacek. A little disappointing — it’s pacy enough, but really light on substance. 2/5 stars
The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, by C.S. Lewis. I meant to post these reviews in the order I read them, but WordPress had other plans, apparently. Dawn Treader is one of my favourites of the series. 4/5 stars
The Art of Language Invention, by David J. Peterson. A really in-depth book about creating languages. A bit much if you’re not planning to create one, but very informative! 4/5 stars
Politics: Between the Extremes, by Nick Clegg. Somewhat self-pitying, but nonetheless an interesting analysis of the ConDem coalition and the need for a more robust liberalism in the future. 3/5 stars
The Lost City of the Monkey God, by Douglas Preston. An entertaining and, as far as I can tell, not too sensationalised book about an expedition to find an abandoned city in Mosquitia. 4/5 stars
Spectacles, by Sue Perkins. Entertaining, but sometimes a bit scatterbrained. 3/5 stars
Dark Tales, by Shirley Jackson. A little collection of some of Jackson’s less well known uncanny stories. I enjoyed them. 4/5 stars
Winter Tide, by Ruthanna Emrys. Takes the sexism and racism out of Lovecraft, with a whole bunch of strong female characters. Buuut, I did find it slow. 3/5 stars

Other posts:

2016 Wrapup, and Onward 2017! Final stats on my reading, and some upcoming challenges.
Top Ten Tuesday: Resolutions. I didn’t stick to the given theme this week, and instead did my bookish resolutions for 2017.

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Stacking the Shelves

Posted 31 December, 2016 by Nikki in General / 20 Comments

Hey everyone! It’s nearly a brand new year, but here’s my last haul for this one first. It’s a pretty epic haul — everyone spoilt me, book-wise. I’m oddly pleased by the fact that I got equal numbers of fiction and non-fiction books!

New Fiction

Cover of Tower of Thorns by Juliet Marillier Cover of The Burning Page by Genevieve Cogman Cover of The Hanging Tree by Ben Aaronovitch Cover of Wake of Vultures by Lila Bowen

Cover of The Wolf Road by Beth Lewis Cover of The Edge of Dark by Brenda Cooper Cover of The Bloodbound by Erin Lindsey Cover of Burn for Me by Ilona Andrews

Cover of the Complete She-Hulk by Dan Slott Cover of The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness Cover of Slade House by David Mitchell

I had ARCs of a couple of these, but it’s good to have a finished copy. I blame Mogsy @ Bibliosanctum for a whole bunch of these — it was her reviews that made me put them on my wishlist.

New Non-fiction

Cover of A New History of Life by Peter Ward Cover of The Death of Caesar by Barry Strauss Cover of The Tyrannosaur Chronicles by David Hone Cover of I Contain Multitudes by Ed Yong

Cover of Natural Histories by Brett Westwood Cover of A Monstrous Commotion by Gareth Williams Cover of The Wood for the Trees by Richard Fortey Cover of The Secret Library by Oliver Tearle

Cover of The Copernicus Complex Caleb Scharf Cover of What If by Randall Munroe Cover of Human Universe by Brian Cox

Tyrannosaurs! The Loch Ness monster! Microbes! It’s a great haul, and I can’t wait to get stuck in.

Finished this week:

Cover of Monstress by Marjorie M. Liu Cover of Murder on the Ballarat Train by Kerry Greenwood Cover of Diamond Dogs by Alastair Reynolds

Cover of Slade House by David Mitchell  Cover of What If by Randall Munroe Cover of Death at Victoria Dock by Kerry Greenwood

Reviews posted this week:

Predictably Irrational, by Dan Ariely. Rather, well, predictable, if you already know your psychology. Still interesting, and very readable. 3/5 stars
Death of a Unicorn, by Peter Dickinson. Does not actually contain any unicorns. I knew that, but still found it disappointing. 2/5 stars
A Monster Calls, by Patrick Ness. A little predictable, but nonetheless, really hard-hitting about grief and dealing with it. 4/5 stars
The Three-Body Problem, by Cixin Liu, trans. Ken Liu. This intrigued me, but I wasn’t totally sucked in. Part of that might be the translation. 3/5 stars
Genome: the Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters, by Matt Ridley. A little dry and a little out of date, but still fun of interesting stuff for the genetics aficionado. 3/5 stars
The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, by Marie Kondo. Some of this goes a little too far into, well, ‘woo’. But the central idea was valuable to me. 4/5 stars
Miniatures, by John Scalzi. More or less what you’d expect if you know Scalzi’s work. Probably great as a collectible, less so for enjoying a solid piece of fiction which goes places. These are fun enough, but they’re all very short (of course) and have the same sort of humour behind them. 3/5 stars

Other posts:

Top Ten Tuesday: Favourites of 2016. Pretty much what it says on the tin.
A Game of Books. So next year, I’m going to treat reaching my reading goals like a game. I get points based on book length and how long it’s been on my TBR, for example. There’s a spreadsheet and anyone’s welcome to join in and play!

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Unstacking the Shelves

Posted 24 December, 2016 by Nikki in General / 12 Comments

It’s nearly Christmas! I can’t wait to give my family their presents — and this is my wife’s first Christmas spent with us, too. It’s gonna be awesome. In the meantime, I’ve been reading a ton. Yay!

For those new to the Bibliophibian, Unstacking the Shelves is when I feature the books I’ve read in the past week, because I don’t have any new ones to show off! I know it’s not what people usually do, but I super appreciate it when people leave a relevant comment instead of just copy/pasting a message telling me to enjoy my haul. Thank you!

Finished this week:

Cover of Camelot's Honour by Sarah Zettel Cover of Miss Phryne Fisher Investigates by Kerry Greenwood Cover of Flying Too High by Kerry Greenwood Cover of The Masked City by Genevieve Cogman

Cover of The Miss Silver Mysteries by Patricia Wentworth Cover of Dark Tales by Shirley Jackson Cover of Memory of Water by Emma Itaranta Cover of Hatchepsut by Joyce Tyldesley

Cover of Strangers in Company by Jane Aiken Hodge Cover of Foxglove Summer by Ben Aaronovitch

Cover of One Plus One Equals One by John Archibald  Cover of Gutenberg's Fingerprint Cover of The Celtic Revolution by Simon Young Cover of The Buried Book by David Damrosch

The first row of these are rereads, but the others were all new and four were ARCs, so definitely good progress.

Reviews posted this week:
Cleopatra: Last Queen of Egypt, by Joyce Tyldesley. Informative about a figure who is honestly mostly myth in general knowledge, and also about the time in which she ruled. 4/5 stars
Terra, by Mitch Benn. It’s cuuute. And fun. 4/5 stars
This is Your Brain on Music, by David Levitin. I feel like I don’t really understand music enough for this book, though the neurological stuff is interesting. 3/5 stars
The Sealed Letter, by Emma Donoghue. Eh. Good on historical details, meh on the characters. 2/5 stars
The Talisman Ring, by Georgette Heyer. Still a very fun adventure/romance. 5/5 stars
Natural Causes, by James Oswald. This was a weird genre-crossing one, entertaining enough but not something I’m interested in continuing to read. 2/5 stars

Other posts:
Top Ten Tuesday: A Very Bookish Christmas. Because of course.

Hope you all have a very good Christmas, if you celebrate, and a warm and safe weekend if you don’t!

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Stacking the Shelves

Posted 17 December, 2016 by Nikki in General / 12 Comments

Happy Saturday! It was going to be an Unstacking, and then people on Netgalley decided to be generous… Also, I have read a lot this week, and it makes me happy. I might actually end up hitting my yearly goals by accident.

Received to review:

Cover of Miniatures by John Scalzi Cover of The Collapsing Empire by John Scalzi Cover of The Stars Are Legion by Kameron Hurley

New Scalzi! Kameron Hurley! Excited!

Finished this week:

Cover of The Sense of Style by Steven Pinker Cover of The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman Cover of The Book by Keith Houston Cover of The Toll-Gate by Georgette Heyer Cover of A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett

Cover of Prince Caspian by C.S. Lewis Cover of Armada by Ernest Cline Cover of The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet by Becky Chambers Cover of Throne of Glass, by Sarah J. Maas Cover of The Voyage of the Dawn Treader by C.S. Lewis

Cover of The Silver Chair by C.S. Lewis Cover of The Last Battle by C.S. Lewis Cover of Invisible Planets ed. Ken Liu Cover of Miniatures by John Scalzi Cover of Weird Dinosaurs

Quite a few of these (Narnia, Throne of Glass) were rereads, but all the same, what a week! Whew.

Reviews posted this week:
She-Hulk: The Complete Collection vol 1, by Dan Slott et al. Fun, though I think it lost momentum somewhat. 3/5 stars
Gut, by Giulia Enders. Irreverent and definitely aimed at the layman, and therefore quite a lot of fun. 3/5 stars
Emma, by Jane Austen. I hate Emma, as a character. ’nuff said. 2/5 stars
The Boys from Brazil, by Ira Levin. Not a fan, let’s say. 2/5 stars
The Man Everybody Was Afraid Of, by Joseph Hansen. There’s a lot of red herrings and such here, but it’s still a solid story. 3/5 stars
Moon Tiger, by Penelope Lively. This is also a book I wasn’t a fan of. Very consciously literary, and unlikeable characters to boot. 1/5 stars
Flashback Friday: Cold Night Lullaby, by Colin MacKay. Do you want to make yourself cry in the most undignified way you can imagine? This might help. 5/5 stars

Other posts:
Top Ten Tuesday: Books in First Half of 2017. Whoa, there’s a lot to look forward to.
What are you reading Wednesday. The weekly update.

Got something to look forward to in the next week? Share!

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Stacking the Shelves

Posted 10 December, 2016 by Nikki in General / 18 Comments

Wow, it’s been a heck of a week for me, acquisitions-wise! And fortunately, I’ve got back into reading a bit more. I have a new project with my reading, which I should post about properly later, which is all about getting back to enjoying it instead of feeling like I have to meet targets or something. It’s helping a lot!

Books to review:

Cover of The House of Binding Thorns by Aliette de Bodard Cover of Dark Tales by Shirley Jackson Cover of Gutenberg's Fingerprint Cover of Miranda and Caliban by Jacqueline Carey

Cover of Strangers in Company by Jane Aiken Hodge Cover of Hunger Makes the Wolf by Alex Wells Cover of The Burning Page by Genevieve Cogman

What a haul, right? I’m especially excited about The House of Binding ThornsThe Burning Page and Miranda and Caliban. Technically, I know I’m getting a copy of The Burning Page for Christmas, but if I get the time to read the ebook first, I’ll be very happy. And it looks like I will!

Books finished this week:

Cover of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis Cover of Camelot's Shadow by Sarah Zettel Cover of The Horse and His Boy by C.S. Lewis Cover of Fair Chance by Josh Lanyon

Cover of The Litany of Earth by Ruthanna Emrys Cover of A History of the World in 12 Maps Cover of Winter Tide by Ruthanna Emrys Cover of A Taste of Honey by Kai Ashante Wilson

Reviews posted this week:

Dark Run, by Mike Brooks. If you’re looking for something a bit Firefly-ish, then this is a good bit. Sometimes I couldn’t decide whether the references were on purpose or weirdly coincidental. It’s a fun set-up, though, with an interesting set of characters who are a bit more diverse than aboard the good ship Serenity. The Maori character, for example, was really fun. 4/5 stars
Ultimate X-Men: Hellfire and Brimstone, by Mark Millar et al. The tension between Wolverine and Cyclops is just… ugh. This series is so juvenile. 2/5 stars
In the Woods, by Tana French. Wow. I really expected to love this, because so many of my friends did, but it was totally unsatisfying as a crime novel and I didn’t find the literary pretensions satisfying either. It might have managed on character, but I ended up disliking most of them. So… Tana French is not for me! 2/5 stars
Captain Marvel: Rise of Alpha Flight, by Tara Butters et al. I wanted this to be a strong continuation of the series for a character I love. It was okay, but not more than that. If you’re more familiar with the other characters, it might be more satisfying, though. 3/5 stars.
Broken Homes, by Ben Aaronovitch. This is… still ow. I think that’s all I need to say. 4/5 stars
Augustus, by John Williams. This is a book I appreciate more for the thought behind it than for the book itself, I think. I liked the way it tried to get a look at Augustus Caesar and some of his contradictions, but I wasn’t always a fan of the way it was put together. 4/5 stars
Flashback Friday: The Gulag Archipelago, by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. This is one of the books my mother gave me (quite rightly) before I went to university, instructing me that this was something I really should read. I didn’t read it before university, but it definitely left an impression. 5/5 stars

Other posts:

Top Ten New To Me Authors in 2016. What it says on the tin… with a little bit of cheating here and there.
What are you reading Wednesday. A very comprehensive update on my current reading!

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Stacking the Shelves

Posted 3 December, 2016 by Nikki in General / 6 Comments

It’s been a better week for me, though I still have one more assignment to eke out. But I did manage some reading! Hurrah.

Books to review:

Cover of Fair Chance by Josh Lanyon Cover of Weird Dinosaurs

I’m going to assume Fair Chance is related to Fair Game and Fair Play, so, awesome. And Weird Dinosaurs, well, who wouldn’t want this one?

Books received:

Cover of Late Eclipses by Seanan McGuire Cover of One Salt Sea by Seanan McGuire Cover of Ashes of Honour by Seanan McGuire

Because my wife is awesome.

Books finished this week:

Cover of Carry On by Rainbow Rowell Cover of How To Clone a Mammoth by Beth Shapiro Cover of The Assassin's Blade by Sarah J. Maas Cover of The Magician's Nephew by C.S. Lewis

Reviews posted this week:
Ultimate X-Men: World Tour, by Mark Millar et al. More enjoyable than the first two volumes, but still not doing much for me. 3/5 stars
The Lost Child of Lychford, by Paul Cornell. If you enjoyed the first Lychford novella, you’ll probably enjoy this too. Judith continues to be completely badass. 3/5 stars
Everything Belongs to the Future, by Laurie Penny. Enjoyable, but rather predictable, to me. 3/5 stars
Rare Earth: Why Complex Life is Uncommon in the Universe, by Peter D. Ward and Donald Brownlee. A good survey of, well, pretty much what it says on the tin. 4/5 stars
The Two Towers, by J.R.R. Tolkien. Do I have anything new to say about this one? Possibly not. 5/5 stars
Flashback Friday: The Empty Kingdom, by Elizabeth E. Wein. The close of the series, which I’ve been re-posting my reviews of for the last few weeks. Greatly enjoyable. 4/5 stars

Other posts:
On giving up, but positively. Why I’ve given up on my reading goals for 2016, and why that’s a good thing.
Top Ten Tuesday: Best Places to Read. A departure from the given theme, forgive me.

How’s everyone else doing?

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